Initial thoughts:

Beautiful sounds and colours, utterly intriguing idea.

Interpretation:

The title is a play on words that will pass many younger people by; this in itself is a reflection on the passage of time and the development of media by which music is recorded and shared.

The physical installation is visually simple, with beautiful rich natural colours that seem to glow in the low light. This complements the soft, ethereal sounds of the bowls.

The use of basic materials in a spartan setting is a clear juxtaposition to the technology required to create the audio output. The singing bowls, which will never need to be ‘tuned’, are a solid constant underneath the uncertainty of the technological future of the piece. These aspects are strongly linked to ‘time’, elegantly and subtly bringing perceptions of past and questions of future together.

The sound of the bowls is calming and creates a contemplative atmosphere for listeners. I imagine the muted colours and stillness of the physical piece enhance this effect further.

Since the musical piece is 1,000 years long and cannot be experienced by an individual in full, this naturally drives one’s thoughts to the future, to what will happen as the piece reaches its conclusion in 2199; will it be stopped or set off on another millennial loop? Will it last until then, become a cultural phenomenon? Or fade into obscurity due to lack of interest or funding? With no possibility of answers to these questions, this train of thought leads inevitably to one’s own mortality and how we use our own time. The length of the piece also influences how it is experienced; listeners who visit the live installations choose how long to stay. Online listeners may have the music playing in the background. It is always accessible.

The way the piece of music is derived by selecting combinations of the composition from each ring of the ‘score’ is reminiscent of an analogue clock; the hour, minute and second hands all use the same 360° face but move at different rates to each describe a different amount of time.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s